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troyesivan:

This video is so, so important. A Jewish girl, and a Muslim girl, both poets, deliver a powerful piece on stereotypes.

Forget what we’ve been indoctrinated to think by our parents, schools, communities, religions and governments. We are all human. Let’s be the generation of peace. 

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tennants-hair:

”im straight but dAMN”, a novel by me

♥ smitten kitten ian gallagher making it totally not obvious at all that he thinks his lil thug boyfriend is the cutest thing he’s ever seen 

(((i was gonna add a definition of the word smitten but it turns out ian’s face above is the definition so)))

(Source: kingoftheashes)

toboldlyfuckingo:

Ms Hudson is concerned the winter has been unduly harsh on him, so she knitted him several turtle cozies.  I find them amusing to look at — thought it’d be a nice way to wake up.

What I’m most impressed by, though, is how this episode gets you to identify so thoroughly with Lester—then immediately removes that identification once he kills his wife because she dared insult him. It’s a tough trick to play, and I’m not precisely sure how Hawley and Bernstein manage it (short of the fact that, y’know, killing your wife because she’s mean to you is the wrong choice in most circumstances). Here’s my best stab at it: When Lester impulsively conks Pearl on the head with the hammer, we immediately cut to a point-of-view shot of her face, frozen in horror, then watch as blood starts to trickle down it. Bernstein is suggesting, subtly, that we, who have been invited to identify with Lester because we’ve all felt picked on by the Sam Hesses of the world, or felt diminished by those we’ve loved, are the ones who’ve perpetrated this crime in some way—perhaps by wishing it would happen within this fictional context. Then, just as quickly, we’re outside of that point-of-view, watching Lester’s hammer swing through the air to connect with his wife over and over, and then we’re just watching him—not even his face—hunch over Pearl as he hits her again and again. We go from being Lester, to seeing the true horror of his actions from an angle that has him swinging toward the camera (and, by extension, us), to an angle that cuts out his face and dehumanizes him. The sequence asks us if we, ourselves, would be capable of something like this, answers “yes” in no uncertain terms, then removes us from Lester to see if we can recognize the gravity of what he’s done. It’s crafty stuff.

TV critic Todd VanDerWerff’s excellent analysis of *THAT* scene in Fargo. Via his review in AV Club (via fxfargo)

(Source: missmollysolverson)

Watching Fargo S01E01: THE SCENE (you know which one)

anarmydoctor:

Lester, what are you doing with that hamm-

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…ok, it’s over… is it over?

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 what’s he doing know… what…

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…thE HECK THAT’S HOT

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oh the joy of analyzing railway stations

captainmjolnir:

People criticizing TFIOS because Gus sounds pretentious???

that was the point???

like literally at his fake funeral his best friend talks about how fucking pretentious he is and how annoying it was???

It was one of his character flaws? He was deliberately written that way?

You’re not being clever or critical by pointing it out, you are literally stating a fact about the novel that the author deliberately wrote

(Source: gameofbooze)

tom-marvolo-dildo:

madilee23:

skeletonflight:

AU The Fault In Our Stars where Hazel Grace succumbs to the cancer and dies and in the last scene all you see is Augustus standing out side with a cigarette between his lips and a hand slowly reaching up to light it.

HOW ABOUT NO

WOW I DIDNT KNOW SOMETHING COULD BE WORSE THAN THE ACTUAL ENDING NOPE BYE

If anyone needs any information about public transportation in Berlin, I’m the one to ask. Omg this assignment is killing me, but I’m learning loads of useless stuff, yay!